Nine 12-hour workshops will be offered throughout the week of May 13-17, 2019. Participants can take a maximum of 2 workshops throughout the week (24 hours in total) by selecting 1 from Session A and 1 from Session B. The Session C workshop on Digital Composition falls outside of the regular schedule. DHSITE will conclude with an exhibition of work generated throughout the week.

Session A workshops:

  • Monday, May 13 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Tuesday, May 14 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Tuesday, May 14 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Wednesday, May 15 from 9:00 to 12:00

Introduction to Text Encoding (12 hrs): Contemplating a text-encoding project? Constance Crompton’s introduction to the theory and practice of encoding electronic texts is for you. The course is also suitable for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines in order to aid others who are embarking on a project or to facilitate the assessment of others’ TEI-based scholarship. No prior experience with XML is assumed, but the course will move quickly through the basics. Workshop offered in English.

Social Media Analysis (12 hrs): What can we learn about an individual from their social media presence? Beyond updates on one’s travels, meals, and academic publications, there are a wealth of “unhealthy” aspects of social media, such as  cyberbullying or depression. How might we analyse online phenomena to learn more about society? Can we solve those problems with intervention? Prasadath Buddhitha’s workshop offers an introduction to the methods and practices of online text analysis (natural language processing) for those online phenomena you want to catch and ultimately avoid. The course is also suitable for those who would like to better understand the computational package behind it, social network analysis , annotation, online text downloading, and acquire basic knowledge of machine learning (AI). No prior experience is required. Workshop offered in English.

Introduction to Text Mining (12 hrs): This workshop is an introduction to text mining in the context of big data in information science and the digital humanities. Instructor Dominic Forest will discuss the origins, the main concepts and the fundamental issues of the text mining. It will present some techniques and methods applied to the processing of textual documents. The workshop will describe different applications of document mining (description of documents, thematic analysis and automatic identification of themes, automatic indexing, etc.). This training will include demonstrations of some software in the field of text mining. This workshop is offered in French.

Curation numérique avec Omeka / Digital Curation with Omeka (Part 1, 12 hrs): Have a research project that might benefit from alternate forms of public dissemination? Interested in bringing digital technology into the classroom but not sure how? Want to experience first-hand community service learning and primary sources mining? Jada Watson’s two-part workshop will introduce participants to the world of digital curation with an open source platform called Omeka. In Part 1, principles of archival curation in a digital world will be discussed and participants will be lead through the first phases of a digital research project from selecting, digitizing and describing cultural artefacts. Part 2 will address tool selection and exhibit designing using Omeka. This workshop marks DHSITE’s first community-based pedagogical initiative. Participants will explore the National Arts Centre’s archives with the instructor and archivist-curator, Robert VanderBerg. The resulting digital projects will be hosted on the DHSITE Omeka, in celebration of the NAC’s 50th anniversary. This is a bilingual workshop. A passive knowledge of French is required. 

Mapping and Spatial Methods in the Humanities (12 hrs): In today’s world, most things happen within a geographic context, and the use of mapping can be an effective technique for exploring, analysing, and presenting this geographic data. Joël Rivard’s interactive workshop is designed for students and researchers who are interested in adding a spatial dimension to their research. In this 12-hour workshop, participants will be introduced to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques from a humanist’s perspective. Starting from primary sources, participants will learn how to extract spatial “clues” from many types of primary sources, create and manipulate GIS-friendly data, transform addresses and place names into geographic coordinates and use georeferencing techniques to bring digitized historical maps into an open-source GIS software. This workshop is offered in French.


Session B workshops:

  • Wednesday, May 15 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Thursday, May 16 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Thursday, May 16 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Friday, May 17 from 9:00 to 12:00

Introduction to 3D Printing (12 hrs): 3D printing has become a popular tool in the maker community as well as in educational settings in recent years. It is not only used to make toys, prototype engineering projects or teach geometry and math, but you can make anything you want with limitless possibilities. In this 12-hour workshop, David McDougall will introduce you to 3D modelling with various softwares, the intricacies that can go with printing a model in 3D as well as other technologies like 3D scanning, time permitting. You will learn 3D modelling from scratch with primitive and more advanced softwares, to edit an existing 3D model for your needs, to use 3D printer slicers to obtain a successful print, the fundamental mechanics of a FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) 3D printer and some finishing processes for 3D prints. Workshop offered in English.

Introduction to Linked Open Data (12 hrs): This course is designed for learners with little to no previous exposure to Linked Open Data (LOD) principles. Instructor Catie Sahadath will offer an introduction to the concepts on which LOD are grounded, and will provide learners will a clear understanding thereof. After completing this workshop, learners will understand how linked open data re used and created. This includes the role of uniform resource identifiers, ontologies, and resource description framework (RDF). Workshop offered in English.

Data visualisation (12 hrs): Visualization of data is usually one of the most important steps when interpreting the data and also for conveying the results. Jarno van der Kolk’s workshop will introduce participants to principles and best practices for presenting data in a way that can be understood by anyone, and investigate a number of tools that can be used. We’ll use Voyant to study text and Gephi to investigate networks. For more interactive ways of sharing data the d3.js framework can be used to create web-accessible interactive visualizations. Finally we will use Python and ParaView to create compelling 3D visualizations. No prior visualization experience is required. At the end of each workshop there will be an open discussion on how the tool can be applied to your own data. Workshop offered in English.

Curation numérique avec Omeka / Digital Curation with Omeka (Part 2, 12 hrs): Have a research project that might benefit from alternate forms of public dissemination? Interested in bringing digital technology into the classroom but not sure how? Want to experience first-hand community service learning and primary sources mining? Part two of Jada Watson’s workshop will explore the world of digital curation with Omeka, focusing on the process of describing cultural artefacts to tool selecting and exhibit designing using Omeka. This workshop marks DHSITE’s first community-based pedagogical initiative. Participants will explore the National Arts Centre’s archives with the instructor and archivist-curator, Robert VanderBerg. The resulting digital projects will be hosted on the DHSITE Omeka, in celebration of the NAC’s 50th anniversary. This is a bilingual workshop. A passive knowledge of French is required. 


Session C Workshop:

  • Tuesday, May 14 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Wednesday, May 15 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Thursday, May 16 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Friday, May 17 from 9:00 to 12:00

Digital Composition (12 hrs): How do people make electronic music? Interested in learning more about writing electronic music? Instructor and composer Julian Bertino will provide an introduction to digital composition, the tools available, and offers hands-on experience using music writing software. The workshop will focus on Ableton Live, a powerful tool for working with MIDI, audio, virtual instruments, and effects. Participants will learn about the interface, its capabilities, live looping, and create a piece of original music from scratch or by remixing sampled audio. Participants will have access to the CreatorSpace for individual work time in the afternoons. This workshop is offered in English.