Workshops

Five 12-hour workshops will be offered throughout the week of May 13-17, 2019. Participants can take a maximum of 2 workshops throughout the week (24 hours in total) by selecting 1 from Session A and 1 from Session B. The Session C workshop on Digital Composition falls outside of the regular schedule. DHSITE will conclude with an exhibition of work generated throughout the week.

Session A workshops:

  • Monday, May 13 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Tuesday, May 14 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Tuesday, May 14 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Wednesday, May 15 from 9:00 to 12:00

Introduction to Text Encoding (DHN3311-C, 12 hrs): Contemplating a text-encoding project? Constance Crompton’s introduction to the theory and practice of encoding electronic texts is for you. The course is also suitable for those who would like to better understand the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines in order to aid others who are embarking on a project or to facilitate the assessment of others’ TEI-based scholarship. No prior experience with XML is assumed, but the course will move quickly through the basics. Workshop offered in English.

Location: 120 University (FSS), room 10003

Social Media Analysis (DHN3311-D, 12 hrs): What can we learn about an individual from their social media presence? Beyond updates on one’s travels, meals, and academic publications, there are a wealth of “unhealthy” aspects of social media, such as  cyberbullying or depression. How might we analyse online phenomena to learn more about society? Can we solve those problems with intervention? This workshop offers an introduction to the methods and practices of online text analysis (natural language processing) for those online phenomena you want to catch and ultimately avoid. The course is also suitable for those who would like to better understand the computational package behind it, social network analysis , annotation, online text downloading, and acquire basic knowledge of machine learning (AI). No prior experience is required. Workshop offered in English.

Location: 120 University (FSS), room 9003


Session B workshops:

  • Wednesday, May 15 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Thursday, May 16 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Thursday, May 16 from 2:30 to 5:30
  • Friday, May 17 from 9:00 to 12:00

Introduction to Linked Open Data (DHN3311-F, 12 hrs): This course is designed for learners with little to no previous exposure to Linked Open Data (LOD) principles. Instructor Catie Sahadath will offer an introduction to the concepts on which LOD are grounded, and will provide learners will a clear understanding thereof. After completing this workshop, learners will understand how linked open data re used and created. This includes the role of uniform resource identifiers, ontologies, and resource description framework (RDF). Workshop offered in English.

Location: 120 University (FSS), room 10003

Data visualization (DHN3311-G, 12 hrs): Visualization of data is usually one of the most important steps when interpreting the data and also for conveying the results. Jarno van der Kolk’s workshop will introduce participants to principles and best practices for presenting data in a way that can be understood by anyone, and investigate a number of tools that can be used. We’ll use Voyant to study text and Gephi to investigate networks. For more interactive ways of sharing data the d3.js framework can be used to create web-accessible interactive visualizations. Finally we will use Python and ParaView to create compelling 3D visualizations. No prior visualization experience is required. At the end of each workshop there will be an open discussion on how the tool can be applied to your own data. Workshop offered in English.

Location: 120 University (FSS), room 14001 (room change)


Session C Workshop:

  • Tuesday, May 14 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Wednesday, May 15 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Thursday, May 16 from 9:00 to 12:00
  • Friday, May 17 from 9:00 to 12:00

Digital Composition (DHN3311-H, 12 hrs): How do people make electronic music? Interested in learning more about writing electronic music? This workshop will provide an introduction to digital composition, the tools available, and offers hands-on experience using music writing software. The workshop will focus on Ableton Live, a powerful tool for working with MIDI, audio, virtual instruments, and effects. Participants will learn about the interface, its capabilities, live looping, and create a piece of original music from scratch or by remixing sampled audio. Participants will have access to the CreatorSpace for individual work time in the afternoons. This workshop is offered in English.

Location: 50 University (PRZ), room 302 (CreatorSpace)

%d bloggers like this:
%d bloggers like this: